Thursday, February 16, 2012

Why Santorum is More Electable than Romney

As a long-time Romney guy this has been painful to admit, but I really think Santorum is the more electable candidate.  From the Five-Thirty-Eight blog (which provides very valuable commentary despite being hosted by the generally fascist NYT):
I argue that one such small factor that could work against Mr. Romney — and possibly in favor of Mr. Santorum — is the Electoral College. A Republican candidate who does poorly with working-class white voters has an extremely tough electoral map because those voters tend to be concentrated in swing states, especially in the Midwest
Yes, exactly.  Romney may be the favorite among Republicans living in big government states, but our states are all going to vote for Obama anyway.  Even the "Live Free or Die" state voted for the smiley faced fascist in the last election.  Let's face it, limited government generally loses to the trendy, fashionable media darling in our states.  Republicans have to be some combination of lucky, socially progressive or an extremely skilled as a politician to win at all and when they do, as Romney did in Massachusetts, the "socially progressive" component does not help at all with swing state voters.

But fortunately for Republicans, there are two types of swing voters, Reagan Democrats and the more upscale suburban independents.  Unfortunately for Romney supporters, the ones who who really matter in the national elections are the blue-collar Reagan Democrats, especially when it comes to the swings states.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Again with the fascist bombs. If the NYT is fascist, then we don't have any word for real fascists like that dude in Germany with the funny mustache.

Mercy Vetsel said...

Actually Hitler was a national socialist with economic policies that eventually showed no substantial differences between those of the Stalin era Soviet Union.

When I use the term fascist, I'm not using the generic pejorative meaning, which is hopeless vague.

Instead, when I say fascist, I'm referring to the specific public policies enumerated by the people who proudly called themselves fascist in the 1920's and 1930's and who fought on both sides in WWII (depending on their country).

For more information, see Goldberg's Liberal Fascism or the Democrat Party Platform (make sure to read the specific planks!)

-Mercy